MICROBIAL BIOCHEMISTRY

Metabolic pathways: Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya


Metabolism refers to the sum of all chemical reactions that take place within a living organism.

Metabolism may be broken down into two parts:

  1. Catabolism - involved in the breakdown of complex organic molecules into simpler substances, usualy resulting in a release of energy (stored in ATP). e.g. glycolysis

  2. Anabolism - simpler substances are used to form more complex molecules in reactions that require energy (ATP). e.g. Synthesis of amino acids, polysaccharides, and nucleotides.

Note: the energy from catabolic reactions is used to drive anabolic reactions.

Enzymes

The reactions in metabolism may be catalysed by enzymes:

Energy Production

Carbohydrate Catabolism

Glycolysis

Respiration

The Krebs Cycle

Electron Transport Chain

Fermentation

Note - other substances such as lipids and protein may also undergo catabolism to produce energy needed by the cell

Photosynthesis

Anabolism


ss12bmi
Author and HTML'd by: Dr Bharat Patel <B.Patel@griffith.edu.au>
HTML'd by: Dr Bharat Patel and Troy Baalham
[Created 20 Sept 1995]
[Modified 20 May 1996]